Fandom

The fault in our stars

 

Just so you know, this is not a book review. I mean, I am nobody to judge books. Also if you find my language Greenish (John Green-Greenish) it is because I finished this book yesterday and the voice it left inside my head is still dictating me right now. So, I might as well use it productively? Huh? I don’t know.

This is a shoulder-to-cry-on journal if you ask me, because you know, you would never be over with this feeling whenever you would look back at the memories, this book gave you.

But let me applaud the genius of this guy, first.

Meanwhile, this guy is also clapping in my next tab.

And Green deserves it all.

Are you sometimes sad by a book and then in hope, try to make yourself cheerful again by finding yourself a good comedy to get over it. But in this case, you just can’t. Why? WHY, YOU SAY?

Because the comical wit and the tragedy of this book is so intricately conjugated that whenever I have an impulse to laugh
(post-reading), I believe I might cry as well. And it is not even about crying. The thing it stirred inside all of us– is a beast of unrequited qualms. Excuse, my poetic notions but you gotta accept it, all of his ideas are difficult to gulp down and a are not easily forgotten by changing the genre and by this, I mean, shifting to other novels with lesser painful potentials. And I don’t even know what genre it was. Cry-till-you-die? Universe-does-not-notice-tragedy? Teenage-death-philosophy might do it certainly. Or my favorite: O-Hell-it-hurts genre.

It will haunt you whenever you see any person in your books dying. And I might as well say that It would haunt you to search Something with a capital S in your life because yeah baby, that is how it is, apart from all metaphorical resonance and shit, we all might be buried under the same stones like stock storage kinda thing. Ordinary? A Pity in the eyes of people who think they know you. After-all the funeral wishes on your wall are derived from the same unknown people who leaves wishes on your “Happy birthday”.

Oh god, what did you do to me, Green?

I just couldn’t believe Augustus was dead. And I wasn’t even crying my eyes out. It became extremely suffocating. Why? Because their is a lesson in this too. Their were small intervals reserved for crying but in the end it never gave me full blown grenade, I felt. And I couldn’t let go. I was expectant. That certainly dug my grave.

For I was expectant that they would somehow, fulfill his wish to become extraordinary. May be in the form of Peter dedicating his sequel to Augustus or Augustus coming up with a sequel, better than Peter Van. But eventually, I could see the truth, this was not going to be the case.

And this ended my desire to want more from this book. Of-course, I cried. Because this is how these genius people roll. I am not crying at narrator’s loss or anything but I am crying in some hope to comfort Waters. To hug him perhaps, to tell him that such people are not ordinary and are extremely rare. Trust the fanbrigade.

Nevertheless, Augustus died ordinary. You know that ordinary and illness stuff he talked about. It still pinches me I know, but what can we do after all.

And who is even that guy playing Waters? Seriously? No justice.

If you think, it is because I do not find him a hot bod. Ugh to you.

Hella, his smile doesn’t even reach his eyes and you think he can play Augustus. The Augustus Waters?

Well, I am not here to criticize anyone and wouldn’t even brag how I imagined him. Because I did not imagined him. To me, he was in some third space where things can somehow work out without a face and hot bod and you can perhaps, feel the personality rather than seeing them.

Aren’t books fantabulous?

Anyhow, I did imagined Hazel as Jennifer Lawrence.

What?

Sue me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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